We have assembled a list of frequently asked questions about turbochargers and supporting tech. Whether it’s about part numbers or settings, you’ll find the most popular questions and answers below. If you don’t see your question, please contact our product support department.

First, all work should be accomplished IAW the applicable engine and/or aircraft maintenance manual.

400 series turbochargers do not incorporate seals in the center housing where the oil is located. They do incorporate small piston rings on the shaft that, along with the gas pressures pushing in, help prevent the oil from coming out. Until there is a varnish built up on the shaft and housing, a new turbocharger will leak oil. This oil seepage may last up to 10 hours but typically is gone within a couple hours of run time. Once the turbo is installed and pre-lubed, run the engine at normal operation to help “seat” the piston rings and build up the protective coat of varnish.

Pre-oiling should be accomplished at installation or any time the turbocharger oil system is disassembled for any reason. Pre-oiling insures there will be adequate oil flow at the turbocharger bearings to support the shaft load at initial start-up. Just like a crank or camshaft bearing, we do not want to “start” the turbocharger with dry bearings. Once a turbocharger bearing is compromised due to lack of lubrication, turbocharger life will be diminished. Pre-oiling instructions can be found under the turbocharger Installation Instructions on the Aeroforce.aero website.

Yes, the compressor and exhaust housings are factory set at a pre-determined position, many times for shipping purposes. The housings can be re-aligned at installation to fit the engine installation. The alignment procedure can be found under the turbocharger Installation Instructions on the Aeroforce.aero website.

Disconnect and cap the oil lines to and from the wastegate assembly. With slow, steady air pressure applied, the butterfly valve should move smoothly from its full open to full closed position. When the airflow is released the butterfly valve should return to the full open position smoothly. Look for sticking or jumpy movement of the butterfly valve.

The age old lubricant is a product called Mouse Milk which can be purchased through most aviation product distributors.

Yes, in most cases controllers will have a small amount of adjustment Available to “fine tune” the turbocharger system. Adjustment should be accomplished IAW the engine and/or aircraft maintenance manual. Be aware that over adjusting may render the component beyond field recovery which may require the unit be returned to a certified component shop for re-certification.

Please see the product line home page, select “Support” and then “Warranty”.

Please see the product line home page, select “Support” and then “Warranty”.

If parts and/or labor are approved under the commercial portion of the ASB or SB, complete the claim form at the end of the bulletin and return to the physical or email address provided in the ASB or SB.

Within 12 months from date of invoice, any unit returned for core shall be as removed from the aircraft, be complete and not disassembled. The core must be identified with an original data tag. Missing data tags or original ink-stamped identification will not be accepted. A percentage of the core value will be charged for all missing or damaged parts.

Any product returned for warranty consideration shall be as removed from the aircraft, be complete and not disassembled. All external parts including, but not limited to, brackets, fittings, bafflings, etc. shall be removed prior to shipment as they will not be returned.

Go to the hartzell.aero website and select Videos under the Resources heading.